March 18, 2012
Fun to be back in the Free Press…

or, more precisely, on freep.com with Detroit143’s version of the state of the city: Complicated with benefits.

May 10, 2011
From the Columbia study

From the Columbia study

May 10, 2011
"Forbes also encourages its largest advertisers to contribute content directly to the magazine and the site as part of their advertising buy. The companies are given tools to publish content—text, video, and photos—on their own page on the site. This might startle journalists who expect strict separation between the editorial and business sides, but DVorkin sees this effort as a logical way to bring in advertisers who know they can create digital content elsewhere, through websites and e-mail. Labeling the material as coming from advertisers helps inoculate the company from violating the church-state divide, DVorkin says, adding that Forbes’s approach allows marketers not to be confined in the “ghetto” of freelance-written advertorial. The advertisers’ material is not edited by Forbes and appears online and in the magazine as “Forbes AdVoice.” (If it’s for the print edition, DVorkin reads it for tone, but says he does no more than that.) The print AdVoice column—limited to one per issue—appears in the table of contents and may run next to a related story. An online column is featured near relevant editorial content."

— From Columbia University study, Business of Digital Journalism.

November 9, 2010
Steve Buttry's list of potential revenue streams

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